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SHT February Blog - Everything You’ve Wanted to Know About Beard Hair Transplants

Everything You’ve Wanted to Know About Beard Hair Transplants

Beard transplants have become six times more popular just within the last 10 years. We’ve seen the demand shoot up the stratosphere–thanks in part to the “hipster” aesthetic, observes some doctors. Chris Hemsworth’s majestically bearded Thor also graced screens for the first time in 2011. Coincidence? Maybe not.

Not everyone is born with the genes of a hairy Norse god, though. Fortunately, beard hair transplants have come a long way since the first hair transplant was conducted in 1996, and is now one of the most in demand procedures in men’s cosmetic surgeries. If you’re considering getting a beard transplant, then below are answers to some of the burning questions you’ve probably been itching to ask:

1. Facial hair transplants are not limited to beards

Facial hair transplants are not limited to beards. You can choose to get a goatee, a moustache, sideburns, eyebrows–basically any hair on your face is fair game. Facial hair transplants are not only for finally sporting the beard of your dreams, it can also help cover acne scars and other facial blemishes.

2. You can shape the beard of your dreams

Beard hair transplants allow patients a fair amount of control over the outcome. You can talk to your surgeon beforehand about your ideal beard’s shape and size. It’s best to take photos for reference to make sure you and your surgeon are actually on the same page before the procedure.

3. The donor hairs are taken from the scalp

Just like traditional hair transplant surgery, the donor hairs are taken from the back portion of the scalp. The sides of the scalp can also be used. The donor site will often be determined by which areas closely match the appearance of facial hair.

These grafts are harvested through FUT (Follicular Unit Transplantation) or FUE (Follicular Unit Extraction). There are pros and cons to each procedure, mainly that FUE results in less noticeable scarring, but FUT allows the surgeon to harvest a greater volume of grafts in one go. Consult with your surgeon for the best course of action for your needs.

4. It takes several hundred to thousands of hair grafts

The number of grafts you’ll need depends on the facial hair you want. Mustaches take an average of 350 to 500 grafts, while goatees require higher, around 600 to 700. Sideburns will need 200 to 250 grafts each. For beards, surgeons transplant an average of 2,500 hair follicles, sometimes more in cases where patients want a fuller bodied beard.

5. The procedure can take up to four hours

How long the procedure will take depends on the facial hair the patient wants. For beards, surgeons typically take 2 to 4 hours to finish. The exact length of the procedure will vary for each patient.

Be wary of places who can guarantee faster surgeries. Beard transplant is a delicate procedure–hair follicles are being arranged and inserted deep into your skin. You do not want surgeons rushing through the procedure. That just leaves you at risk of developing patchy facial hair, or worse, an infection from poorly grafted transplants.

6. Transplanted hairs will fall out after two weeks

Patients should expect a fair amount of hair loss a couple of weeks following the procedure. This is known as “shock loss”, and is a completely normal part of the healing and recovery process.

Hairs will grow back within three months. While the phenomenon is not fully understood yet, many theorize and attribute shock loss to changes in blood supply in the scalp, trauma following surgery, or a reaction to the anesthesia. In any case, the “shocked” follicles begin growing hair again after a period of time, you just need to give them time to adjust to their new homes!

7. There will be risks involved

Like any surgical cosmetic procedure, beard hair transplants also come with certain risks. Post-operative risks include bruising, swelling, and redness in the area. Many patients wonder if there will be some pain following the procedure. The short answer? Yes. Your surgeon just cut off a piece of your scalp. Patients should expect some pain and discomfort, which can be easily managed by painkillers. Scarring is also a risk, but one that can be mediated with proper aftercare.

8. You may have to take a day off

The procedure can last up to 5 hours, so you will definitely need to use a sick day for the procedure. You might also want to use the following day to recover, and for the most noticeable of the redness and swelling to subside.

9. Gray will stay gray

If you have salt-and-pepper hair, your new beard will naturally be the same color. Contrary to what some people may believe, gray hair is not unhealthy hair. They are just the result of hair follicles who have stopped producing melanin. Your surgeon will strategically transplant gray hair so the beard is not spotty and looks natural.

10. Forever bearded

Beard transplants are mostly permanent. Just like normal facial hair, they regrow when you shave or wax them off. There are no take-backs if you suddenly want a smooth chin. While surgeons may be able to remove the grafts, there is no way of doing so without leaving some scars. You can also have it lasered away, but that defeats the purpose of uprooting perfectly healthy hair follicles from your scalp.

A beard transplant in Sydney typically costs between $7000 to $10000, depending on the extent of work you need done. While obviously not steep, it pays not to be cheap. There is no accounting for the quality of transplants from clinics who advertise cheaper, faster services. We at Sydney Hair Transplant believe that when it comes to surgical procedures, safety should be at the top of your list, not cost.

Have more questions about beard transplants? You can call us at 1300-656-236, or schedule a free consultation with our hair loss consultants.

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SHT January Blog - What Is Hair And Why Do People Lose It

What Is Hair And Why Do People Lose It?

What is hair made of?

Hair is made of a protein called keratin. They are made by tiny organs beneath the skin called follicles. Here are 10 fun facts you may not know about crowning glory:

  • Your head is currently home to roughly 100,000 to 150,000 strands of hair. Quite the number! So a few strands of hair on the floor or on your brush is no cause for panic. In fact, the average person sheds 50 to 150 strands a day.
  • Seasons can affect hair loss. In a bid to keep us warm, hair grows thicker during colder seasons like autumn and winter. We subsequently shed more hair come summer or spring, when our bodies no longer have the use for all the extra strands.
  • As you read this, around 90 percent of your hair is quietly growing. The average hair strand grows by half a millimeter per day. The remaining 10 percent are in a resting phase.
  • Hair follicles are found everywhere on the body–except for the lips, the palms of our hands, and the soles of our feet.
  • Our hair is made of the same amazing stuff as horse hooves and rhino horns.
  • Hair is like a profile sheet made of keratin. A single strand can say a lot about you, your age, your race, what your diet may look like, and if you take any illegal substances. That’s why criminal investigators often turn to hair for forensic evidence. The only thing it won’t reveal about you is your sex — hair structure is the same for men and women.
  • Hair is 5 percent sulphur.
  • Redheads have the least number of hair follicles. Red is also the rarest hair color, with only 1 percent of the population born with it.
  • We are born with about 5 million hair follicles. These are all that we are going to have during our lifetime. It’s not possible to naturally grow new follicles, just as it’s not possible to grow new kidneys.
  • Hair color is produced by cells called melanocytes. They are found in the hair bulb, at the base of hair follicles. Melanocytes have a limited lifespan and become damaged with every new cycle of hair growth. Hair starts turning grey when only a few of these guys remain. Eventually, our hair will turn white when all our melanocytes kick the bucket.

 

Why does hair loss occur?

Hair loss can be caused by many things — from how you wear your hair, autoimmune diseases, environmental stressors, and genetics. While most are beyond your control, it should go without saying that taking poor care of your health, such as eating poorly and smoking, are also major factors in hair loss.

 

What can I do to restore my hair?

There are many ways to deal with hair loss. These are generally divided into two categories: surgical, and non-surgical.

Non-surgical methods involve the use of minoxidil and finasteride. The surgical option involves transplanting hair, either through follicular unit transplant (FUT) or follicular unit extraction (FUE). We’ll talk about their differences later in the article.

 

How does minoxidil work?

Minoxidil is the compound behind the popular Rogaine. It stimulates hair growth instead of stopping it. Minoxidil does this by dilating blood vessels. Put it on your scalp, and it relaxes blood vessels, making them more permeable to oxygen and nutrients. In turn, nutrient-rich blood nourishes hair follicles, promoting hair growth.

First-time users of minoxidil should be aware that the first phase of this treatment results in some hair loss. Minoxidil restarts hair growth by shedding strands that are in the resting phase of growth and then kickstarting the follicle to produce new hair.

Minoxidil often comes in liquid form, and can be applied through a spray pump or droppers. One of the downsides of minoxidil is that it needs to be constantly applied. Once you stop, hair loss will start again. It also takes a few months for noticeable results to appear, so don’t expect to wake up with a thick tuft of hair after one spray.

 

How does finasteride work?

Finasteride treats hair loss by working at the hormone-level. It stops testosterone from becoming dihydrotestosterone, which makes hair follicles shrink. Unlike minoxidil, finasteride can slow baldness, and in some cases, even promote regrowth.

Finasteride often comes in pill form, taken once a day over a few months to a year. Effects typically appear 3 months into treatment. Because it affects hormones, treatment with finasteride may come with more serious side-effects than minoxidil, such as reduced libido, and facial swelling.

It is possible to use finasteride and minoxidil at the same time. However, you should consult with your doctor first about how to manage treatments.

 

How does FUT work?

Follicular unit transplant restores bald spots, thinning hair, and receding hairlines. A strip of tissue with healthy follicles is taken from a “donor site”, which usually lies near the nape of the neck. The tissue is them grafted onto the transplant site. FUT is the traditional way of performing transplants.

The main downside of FUT is the longer recovery period compared to FUE, although both are outpatient procedures. There is also a possibility of developing linear scarring at the donor site. However, FUT results in thicker volumes of hair on the transplant site, making it more ideal for severe hair loss.

 

How is FUE different from FUT?

Instead of extracting a whole strip of skin, doctors transfer follicles one by one to the donor site using a small tool called an FUE punch. Follicles are taken from a much larger area, which distributes thinning and makes the transplant look less noticeable. There will still be some scarring at the incision sites left by the punch, but these are usually less a millimeter long, and scab over 3 to 7 days after the procedure. Patients who opt for FUE usually find that they can start wearing short hair soon after.

Got any hair-related questions? Wondering the best course of treatment for your hair loss? Call us at 1300 656 236 or book an appointment at no cost. Our consultants would be happy to comb through solutions with you.

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Sydney Hair Transplant - Hair Transplant Aftercare Cheat Sheet

Hair Transplant Aftercare Cheat Sheet

The final stretch is a critical time in achieving your desired results. Now, the ball is in your court and you play a significant part in ensuring that you are setting yourself up for surgical success. Here are hair transplant aftercare tips to get you started.

 

Normal Things to Expect

Bleeding. This is normal, but it should be minimal.

Crusting. It is normal for crusts to form on the recipient site a few days after the surgery. It is part of the healing process which you should not remove before it is actually ready to fall off.

Swelling. It usually starts around 2-4 days after hair transplant surgery, and it will last about 3 days.

Pain. Pain is a normal response to any trauma to the skin especially during the first week after surgery. The good thing is that it is easily manageable with pain medications and it should subside over the next few days.

 

General Hair Care Instructions

  • On the day after surgery, some surgeons will allow you to wash your hair gently under the shower.
  • When showering, do not stand under a power shower as the pressure, especially during the early post-surgical period. Doing so may dislodge the hair grafts, especially during the first 4-5 days. It helps to have a cup in the shower to help rinse the surgical sites.
  • Gently dab a clean towel over the area after rinsing. Avoid hair dryers for 1-2 weeks, especially the hot ones.
  • Comb gently so as not to dislodge grafts or disturb incisions.
  • Since the sutures used during a hair transplant is non-dissolvable, these will be removed from the donor areas around 14 days following surgery. In any case that any sutures are dislodged do not pull it off and just let it fall by itself.
  • When heading out, avoid direct sun exposure on the grafts for 4 weeks. If you are going outdoors, be sure to wear a hat. However, be properly advised on how to wear it properly.
  • You must stop smoking at least 4 weeks before and after surgery to help you achieve the best results. Smoking interferes with wound healing and it may increase your risk for complications.
  • Avoid alcohol especially for the first week after surgery because this can increase your risk for bleeding. You must not drink any alcohol if you are using any pain medications prescribed as these should not be mixed.
  • Limit your caffeine fix as much as possible as this can increase bleeding. Keep it to two cups at the most.
  • Wear button-down shirts for the first 5 days after surgery. Avoid wearing shirts that you have to pull over your head as it may dislodge transplanted grafts.
  • If you have been using hair loss medications before the procedure, it can be resumed days after surgery. Oral medication can be resumed on the 3rd post-surgical day, while topical medications can be resumed on the 7th
  • A cold compress (gel or ice packs) can be applied gently on the head or the back of the scalp a few times for the first night or 7-8 times a day for the next two days after surgery. This can help relieve pain and it can also help reduce swelling.

Important Points on Hair Transplant Surgery Aftercare

Pain Control

Pain is a subjective experience, but this is an expected sensation during the first 2 nights following surgery. To alleviate any discomfort on the surgical sites involved, you can always take the pain medication prescribed by your doctor. This should control your discomfort, allowing you to rest and heal better.

Medications prescribed may include:

  • Acetaminophen – over-the-counter pain medications to treat mild to moderate pain (ex. Tylenol)
  • Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS) – over-the-counter medications to treat mild to moderate pain (ex. Ibuprofen, Naproxen)
  • Opioids – for moderate to severe pain

In any case that the pain increases in intensity days after your procedure, report this to your surgeon. Pain can be a sign of infection, especially if there is redness on the area, warm to the touch, or if you develop a fever.

Wound Care

Effective wound healing is necessary for effective wound healing on the donor and recipient sites. Hair transplantation is treated much like any other post-surgical wound. It involves days of head dressings, punch grafts healing, and antibiotic therapy.

Donor Area

The wound at the donor area requires much additional collagen formation to close. If a tricophytic closure is used, healing at the donor site will be a combination of full thickness and partial thickness wounds. This needs proper moisture balance to optimize healing and reduction of tension to reduce scarring.

The importance of cleansing the back of the scalp cannot be emphasized enough. To do this you can soak the area first with water for one minute. Unless it is contraindicated by the surgeon, you can massage the donor area with shampoo using the pads of your fingers. Just let the water gently stream over the back of your head and prevent it from directly hitting the top of your scalp where the new grafts are implanted.

Recipient Site

The recipient site heals faster than the donor area due to the small size of the incisions created. Good moisture balance is also necessary to maintain optimal healing. While some think that Vaseline is adequate in providing moisture, some prefer to use medicated ointments.

Washing the new grafts must be done very gently. Surgeons suggest that you should not touch the grafts for the first week. You can prepare soapy water over the area. To prepare this you can dissolve a teaspoon of shampoo to a pitcher of water and pour it gently over the new grafts for 20 seconds. Rinse it for a good 20 seconds as well. Avoid doing it for too long or the grafts may absorb water and “pop up.”

After the first week, you can already start to work on loosening the crusts. Remember that excessive crust formation is also linked to potential infections. To carefully loosen these, you may place a bit of baby oil and gently rub it with the pads of your fingers. Follow it up with shampoo or a soapy solution before rinsing it with water. Never use fingernails to pick off the scabs as this can lead to scarring. Shampooing every day can help loosen the scabs until these are ready to fall off.

Every surgeon has their own post-surgical care instructions, but regardless of what they are it must be followed carefully. Also remember that while some of the factors for wound healing is under the patient’s direct control, much of it is not. As a matter of fact, a large portion of wound healing has much to do with the surgeon’s techniques and the patient’s inherent characteristics

Antibiotics

There are some disputes among doctors regarding the use of antibiotics after hair transplant surgery. In most cases, doctors prescribe preventative antibiotics (prophylactic treatment), but some believe that there is no need for it at all. They believe that it is only necessary to provide antibiotic treatment only if there is already an infection present.

However, doctors who prefer to err on the side of caution would prefer that they give the medication right after treatment. This is to avoid any potential cause of infection.

Work and Exercise

You are to refrain from any strenuous activities during the first week after surgery. Minimal activity is recommended for the first 12 hours. It is also important to avoid excessive head movements and bending over during the first 24 hours. This is to prevent undue stress on the surgical site especially when it is still highly vulnerable. Some people may return to light work the day after surgery, but some may prefer to take at least 2-4 days off from work. However, due to physical signs of healing such as swelling and crusting, some patients opt to take a week off.

Follow-Up Check-Up

The follow-up check-up is an important step because this is a way for your surgeon to monitor your progress. You will also be set an appointment for suture removal around 2-3 weeks after surgery.

 

What You need to Do About Potential Adverse Reactions:

Bleeding

You may expect bleeding to occur the night after surgery and a few days after that. This may stop if firm pressure is applied on the area for 15 minutes. You can press it firmly but gently to prevent dislodging any surrounding grafts.

If you are unable to control the bleeding with rest and gentle pressure, inform your surgeon right away. Persistent bleeding is a sign that your surgical site is not healing as it should be.

Swelling

Swelling is an inflammatory response of the body to the slight trauma created by the surgery. It usually occurs on the forehead around day 2-4 after the procedure. The swelling may descend to the eyelids due to gravity.  However, this should be no cause for worry because it will not leave any permanent problems.

You can significantly reduce swelling if you sleep with your head elevated at 45 degrees for at least 3 nights. To do this you may prop up your head on two pillows or use a recliner. Normally, swelling would subside by itself within a couple of days. Therefore, any prolonged swelling, especially if it is accompanied by pain or if it is warm to the touch, may be a sign of infection.

Infection

The risk for infection is present in any surgical procedure. While it may be rare in hair transplants, the likelihood of it happening cannot be eliminated.

The telltale signs of infection may include redness, discomfort, swelling, or bleeding. This would mean that the side effects of hair transplant surgery have only gotten worse instead of getting better. This also implies that the surgical site is compromised.

To prevent infection after hair transplant surgery you can follow these tips:

  • Avoid touching the surgical site (donor and recipient areas)
  • Do not pick on the scabs as they heal, allow them to fall off by itself
  • Follow post-op care instructions carefully
  • Avoid smoking and alcoholic beverages during recovery
  • Make sure that you attend follow-up visits as scheduled by your surgeons

If you think you show any signs of an infection, immediately report it to your doctor so that prompt treatment can be given.

Remember that these are just general information which you can use during your consultation to ask the right questions. You are more than welcome to ask us your questions or concerns. Book your consultation with Dr. Daood today. 

 

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Sydney Hair Transplant - What To Do When Hairs Start Falling A Guide On Hair Loss

What To Do When Hairs Start Falling: A Guide On Hair Loss

Hair loss is a prevalent condition that happens to men and women alike. A third of women experience hair loss in their lives, triggered by hormonal imbalances brought on by pregnancy or menopause. But hair loss is particularly widespread in men. Otherwise healthy males can experience hair loss as soon as their early 30s. By age 50, over half of men report hair loss.

So if you’ve come searching for explanations for a thinning crown of hair, you’re not alone. Hair loss treatment is a US$3.6 billion dollar industry, with millions going into research each year. Today’s treatments, while still not perfect, are a long way from us rubbing pigeon droppings on our heads.

Here’s what you need to know about hair loss, how to avoid it, and how to prepare for it.

  • Risk Factors For Hair Loss
  • Signs of Hair Loss
  • Non-Surgical Remedies For Hair Loss
  • Living With Hair Loss

 

Risk Factors For Hair Loss

There are a number of reasons for hair loss. A large number of cases, though, can be attributed to genetics–around 95 percent in men, to be exact.

Yes, that’s right. Some people draw the short straw, and are more prone to hair loss. Called androgenetic alopecia, this form of hair loss due to genetics occurs because of a little hormone called dihydrotesterone (DHT). DHT is a derivative of the more well-known testosterone. And while critical to the development of typical male parts like the penis and prostate, DHT wrecks havoc on hair follicles by shrinking them, effectively cancelling their ability to produce healthy hair. How susceptible you are to DHT is dictated by how much testosterone your body converts into DHT.

But hair loss can be a physiological problem in more ways than getting bad genes from your parents. Hair loss can also be a symptom of an inactive or overactive thyroid. It can also be symptomatic of an autoimmune disease called lupus, which destroys hair follicles, or a fungal infection of the scalp that causes a hair loss condition called “tinea capitis”.

Hair loss is also an unfortunate side-effect of a handful of medications, such as antidepressants, Vitamin A, and gout medicine. People bulking up muscle and consuming protein shakes may also inadvertently be exposing themselves to hair loss. Protein shakes contain growth promoting nutrients, which also raises the testosterone levels in your body. And as we’ve mentioned above, the higher levels of testosterone, the more sources for DHT.

Another common, but lesser known cause of hair loss is styling. Certain hairstyles that pull on the roots and hair follicles, like dreadlocks, weaves, and ponytails, especially when applied to hair that has already been chemically treated, can lead to hair loss. This type of hair loss is called traction alopecia, and when left unmediated, can lead to permanent hair loss.

 

Signs of Hair Loss

Hair loss, to an extent, is normal. Everyone sheds. Just like nails and our skin, our hair has a limited lifespan. A strand of hair typically stays on our head for two to five years before shedding. There are over 100,000 hair follicles on a healthy person’s head — losing anywhere from 50 to 100 strands a day is considered normal.

Increased hair loss over the winter months is also normal. Called seasonal hair loss, shedding may get worse during months when the sun is scarce. Our bodies form thicker hair as a defense against harsh UV rays. When winter rolls in, we no longer have use for the extra hair, and our bodies shed it as a response.

What’s not normal, however, is pulling away clumps of hair, thinning at the top of your head, or forming patchy bald spots. When these begin to happen, it may be time to see your doctor to rule out androgenetic alopecia, or get the appropriate medication to mediate hair loss before it does any lasting damage.

 

Non-Surgical, Organic Remedies For Hair Loss

Over the years, the fight against hair loss has broadened to include certain types of food. Recent studies have shown that the following food types can slow hair loss, and promote healthy hair follicles:

  • Sunflower oil: Sunflower oil stimulates hair growth by giving your scalp much needed moisturization. It also contains Oleic acid, a component that helps prevent hair breakage.
  • Eggs: Eggs are rich in biotin and Vitamin B, nutrients that can prevent hair loss by strengthening your roots. You can either take them for breakfast, or rub a hair mask made of egg whites directly onto the scalp to help hair follicles absorb nutrients directly.
  • Spinach and Raisins: Our hair follicles use iron to create healthy strands of hair. Studies show that brittle hair can be the result of iron deficiency. Fortunately, iron is abundant in many food types. Spinach and raisins in particular are packed with iron. A 180 gram bag of spinach already contains 35 percent of your iron needs; a small bag of raisins, around 0.8 mg. Women need around 18 mg a day of iron, while men need 8.

 

Living With Hair Loss

There are many options for treating hair loss. Non-invasive treatments include taking minoxidil and finasteride to promote the hair regrowth, or laser therapy for subtle regrowth. You can also opt for surgical hair implants. Losing your hair doesn’t need to be the end of the world.

You can get creative with your hair. Hairstylists often know how to play with texture and depth to give your hair more volume and thickness. If you’ve ever wanted that buzz cut or fade, but was too worried about losing hair, then now is the perfect time to experiment.

Knowing that you’re starting to lose your hair is never fun. But it doesn’t have to be a reason for despair. From changing your diet and hairstyle, to many non-surgical and surgical options for treatment, you’re never left helpless against hair loss.

You can call us at 1300 656 236 if you have questions our guide hasn’t answered yet or book an appointment for free with our consultants.

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Sydney Hair Transplant - Everything you Need To know: Ultimate Hair Transplant Guide October 2018 Featured Blog Image

Everything You Need to Know: Ultimate Hair Transplant Guide

Doing your homework before undergoing any major medical procedure isn’t just a smart thing to do, but is absolutely essential. Knowing what to expect and what’s expected of you goes a long way toward achieving the best possible results.

Here, you’ll find everything you need to know about getting a hair transplant in Sydney, whether you’re still debating the merits of a hair transplant, or are already shopping around for where to have it done.

  • Answers to Common Hair Transplant Questions
  • Considerations Before Getting A Hair Transplant
  • Costs Involved in Hair Transplants
  • Preparation and Aftercare
  • Variations in Hair Transplant Procedures

Answers to Common Hair Transplant Questions

Just like any surgical procedure, a hair transplant can be intimidating—however badly you might want one, wondering about things like where the hair will come from and how much it’s going to hurt can make you hesitate.

Among the Frequently Asked Questions about hair transplants are how old you have to be, or whether you can have it done if your hair loss isn’t that bad, yet. Most surgeons don’t recommend a transplant for patients under 23, and you could actually have a transplant if your hairline is already starting to recede, depending on the surgeon’s assessment.

Other questions involve how much time it will take for results to show, and how natural the transplant will look. After all, nobody wants to have someone go up to them and say, “Hey, that’s a great-looking transplant.”

There are also gender-specific hair transplant concerns such as differences in hair loss progression and ideal donor sites for the transplant. The focus of the procedure also differs between men and women—men usually focus on their receding hairline while women focus on restoring volume on top and behind their heads.

Considerations Before Getting A Hair Transplant

Surgery isn’t usually something people have done on the fly, and a hair transplant is no exception. Even if the reasons for getting one are fairly obvious, many people wonder whether it’s a good idea to have a transplant when it comes right down to it.

In the first place, you’d have to consider whether you’re eligible for the procedure, as not everyone can get a hair transplant because of factors such as the number of donor sites and overall health. You might also be too young to get a hair transplant, as most surgeons agree that 40 and up is the ideal age.

But arguably the most important considerations before undergoing the procedure involve the reliability of the clinic where you’ll be having it done. You should think twice if clinic doesn’t have hair transplants as its speciality, or have a portfolio that showcases its work. Other warning signs include having no contact with previous patients or professional affiliations.

Costs Involved in Hair Transplants

Perhaps the most pressing consideration is how much a hair transplant costs, especially since there are a lot of things apart from the procedure itself that you’ll have to pay for. There’s the consultation, the surgeon’s fee, anaesthesia fees and GST, not to mention the medications you’ll need such as antibiotics.

 

The factors that affect how much you’ll end up spending include the size of the area to be treated, the surgical technique to be used, the number of grafts to be made, and how many sessions you’ll have to undergo.

 

While it can be tempting to cut corners for cost-cutting’s sake, bear in mind that these penny-pinching ploys are not without risk—you could end up with an incompetent surgeon, or worse, surgical complications.  

 

The good news is that while hair transplants aren’t currently covered by insurance, there are payment options that can help such as loans offered by financing companies.

Preparation and Aftercare

Once you’ve settled on having the procedure and on a reputable surgeon to perform it, there are several things you’ll have to do to prepare for your hair transplant. You need to make sure you’re healthy enough to withstand surgery, and provide your surgeon with your complete medical history. Naturally, your surgeon will also have to evaluate your hair, which may include a biopsy.

Being aware of the risks involved or as the possible complications should be part of your preparation. Be sure to discuss this thoroughly with your surgeon, as well as the possibility that you might not be satisfied with the outcome of the transplant.

Be sure to prepare well for after the surgery. You will need someone to drive you home, as the anaesthesia might have lingering effects even after the surgery. Be sure not to schedule any activities that will make you sweat, or involve swimming. Your scalp is basically an open wound after the surgery, and you’ll need to keep it dry and clean to avoid infection. You may also want to take a few days off work to give yourself time to heal, so schedule around the surgery accordingly.

Variations in Hair Transplant Procedures

When people think of hair transplants, they often think of older folks and receding hairlines. But a hair transplant can be done on virtually any part of the body that grows hair.

Eyebrow hair transplants, for instance, is one such procedure that has gained popularity over the years, thanks to celebrities with fuller eyebrows. The procedure is often done by women who want bushier eyebrows, or those who want to fix eyebrows that have gone patchy due to years of overplucking.

Men who aspire for majestic beards but have been saddled with genes for baby smooth chins can now grow the beard of their dreams because of facial hair transplants. And the procedure is not limited to beards–you can have hair follicles transplanted to form goatees, mustaches, or some sick sideburns.

What all hair transplants have in common is that the procedure boils down to using two methods: follicular unit extraction (FUE) or follicular unit transplant (FUT). FUT is the traditional method for hair transplants which uses strips of skin grafts. FUE extracts individual hair follicles using a special tool, and injects them on the donor site.

Have questions that our guide hasn’t answered yet? Call us at 1300 656 236, or book an appointment for free with our hair transplant consultants.

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